Life may be a dream or a nightmare; both can be your reality here on Earth. The world has arrived at a point where innocent people must pay with everything they own, including their lives, for their leaders’ decisions.

Greed and power have infiltrated nearly every country and government, driving duties for the benefit of the ruling body rather than the people it is intended to serve. Our younger generations are the ones who suffer the most, our children, who are caught in the middle of conflict, starvation, poverty, and everything else they are not intended to experience.

This can happen in certain nations, while others have given their inhabitants good living conditions, allowing them to have a normal existence and become responsible future leaders.

However, is it fair that one portion of the globe gets to enjoy their rights while another half of the world goes through each day without knowing where they could obtain assistance? These are issues that must be addressed as a single, united globe. Every child is entitled to a good childhood to enjoy a happy life.

Uğur Gallenkuş has been troubled by this notion. He is an Istanbul-based photographer who depicts the world’s duality, which provides contrasting lifestyles for diverse children throughout the world. He has developed a photo series that has now been transformed into a book by putting his ability and abilities to work.

This contains images of children from both worlds, edited side by side and morphing into one shot allowing the world to see the duality that children experience. These stunning pictures have sparked a lot of debate in the internet community and have been widely shared.

More Info: Uğur Gallenkuş | Facebook | ugurgallenkus.com

#1

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

On September 14, 2017, a Rohingya refugee lady carried her son after landing by boat at the nearest beach to the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, Shah Porir Dip Island, Teknaf, Bangladesh.

#2

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

Rosina is her name. She is a 14-year-old Bangladeshi sex prostitute.

#3

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

Pakistani girls attend a school that the Taliban have targeted on two occasions. Pakistan, Nowshera, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, 2013.

#4

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

A parent with his child at the district hospital’s intensive care unit in Mora, Cameroon’s Far North Region. Malaria, diarrhea, and malnutrition are the most common illnesses among African children. The date is February 20, 2019.

#5

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

After the Israeli bombing, Salem Saoody, 30, bathes his daughter Layan (L) and niece Shaymaa 5 (R) in the sole remaining component of their destroyed house, the bathtub. Gaza, 2015.

#6

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

In Jalozai, Pakistan, in 2012, a kid with dengue illness grips the hand of a doctor.

#7

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

At Dibaga Refugee Camp, a refugee child watches the sunset. Iraqis trapped in the crossfire of the Islamic State have fled to refugee camps near Mosul. The battle has left profound wounds in the minds of youngsters, and it has halted more than two decades of educational progress. Iraq, August 2016.

#8

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

On September 6, 2017, a Rohingya refugee girl stood close to Myanmar refugees in Ukhiya, Bangladesh. With youngsters accounting for around 60% of the Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, many children under 18 arrived in the makeshift tents traumatized after witnessing family members being slaughtered and houses being set on fire.

#9

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

During a break at the factory where they work, two young employees eat their lunch: Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka.

#10

The Lives of Children in Different Parts of the World
Uğur Gallenkuş

Children at a brick industry in Fatullah, Bangladesh, near Dakka. They get the equivalent of 0.9 USD for every thousand bricks they transport.

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